Sociology Courses That Might Be Of Interest To Pre-Law Students

 

Class Name Class Number Meeting Times
Criminology (SOC 307)

Why do individuals commit crime? This course examines and assesses a variety of theories from each of the three main criminological paradigms classical, positivist, and critical, with special attention to the role of important crime correlates such as class, gender, and race. In addition to theories of crime, the course also turns a critical lens to sources of crime knowledge (including popular media and national data sources), and introduces punishment philosophies and how they relate to theories of criminality.

21982 MWF 2-2:50PM
Drugs & Society (SOC 311)

Understanding the relationship between drugs and their social context provides insights into why, despite the risks, people find consciousness alteration meaningful. Topics covered in this course may include: the kinds of experiences/problems that arise from drug use; shifting perspectives on drug use in society; the emergence of drug crusades and drug legislation in America; the relationship between drug use and crime; the prevention and treatment of alcohol and drug problems; and current domestic and international drug control policies.

18564 TR 9:30-10:50AM
Criminal Justice Systems (SOC 317)

This course examines the varying functions of criminal justice institutions: police, prosecutors, courts, probation services, and prisons and jails. Students will explore how the structure and practice of the criminal justice system varies across countries and will think critically about changes in the purpose and effectiveness of criminal justice institutions in the U.S. over time. Students will also understand the theoretical and practical role of these institutions in (re)producing or mitigating social inequality.

21986 MW 6:30-7:50PM
Juvenile Justice (SOC 319)

This course is organized around several themes: how delinquency is defined and measured, the sociological factors that put a child at risk for becoming a part of the juvenile justice system; the roles of gender, race, and class, as well as culture, families, schools, and communities, in predicting delinquency; and, responses to juvenile delinquency via the juvenile court process, youth corrections in the community, and out of home juvenile placements. Students will also examine how contact with the juvenile justice system may lead to or prevent future contact with the criminal justice system in adulthood.

21983 TR 12:30-1:50PM